From General Hospital to the Hospital of Souls:  Interview with Jonathan Jackson, USA

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

From General Hospital to the Hospital of Souls: 

Interview with Jonathan Jackson

Source:

http://www.ancientfaith.com

http://www.ancientfaith.com/podcasts/emmaus/general_hospital

ANCIENT FAITH

Four-time Emmy award-winner Jonathan Jackson, star of General Hospital and Tuck Everlasting, talks with Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick about his journey into Orthodox Christianity, his family, how he lives his faith as a Hollywood actor, music and writing, on this special episode of Roads From Emmaus.

Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick: This is Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick, and this is kind of a different episode of Roads From Emmaus. You’re used to hearing me talk in front of a microphone to a bunch of people listening in at a lecture, but today actually we’re doing a conversation. I’m doing an interview with someone. Why would I do that? The reason is that I’m very dedicated to questions of communion and place and what is local and what is connected directly. So once I had heard that my guest for today was out on the East Coast, we worked out a way to connect in person. We’re currently sitting in the parking lot of Newark Liberty International Airport, where he is getting ready to get on his plane to head back to the West Coast.

My guest today is Mr. Jonathan Jackson, who is an actor and a musician perhaps best known for his guest role as Lucky Spencer on General Hospital, which has played for the last couple of years—well, they think you’re taking a break now—but also you’re in a film, Tuck Everlasting, from about ten years ago. He’s won four Emmys, and he also had a recurring role on the Fox series The Sarah Connor Chronicles, which is a spin-off from the Terminator movies, and he has his own band, which is called Enation, and that is why he was here on the East Coast.

Why, you may ask, am I interviewing a man who is a soap opera star? Well, the reason is that right now, he and his family are catechumens in the Orthodox Church. So, thank you very much for meeting with me. I am very honored to be with you, truly.

Mr. Jonathan Jackson: Thank you, Father. I am honored as well. I appreciate it. Glad to be here.

Fr. Andrew: My first question is: how did you get here? What is your religious background?

Mr. Jackson: Both of my parents were raised Seventh-Day Adventists, about probably four generations on each side, Seventh-Day Adventists. So I grew up with that as part of my Christian upbringing until probably about the age of nine or ten. My parents started moving away from that particular denomination. And we moved to Los Angeles when I was ten, just turning 11, started working as an actor pretty quickly. I started on General Hospital when I was 11, so I started really…

Fr. Andrew: Right, and just for those of my listeners who are a little bit older, you may remember from the late 1970s and the early ‘80s, the super-couple Luke and Laura on General Hospital, and Jonathan played their son, Lucky. So that puts you within the soap opera pantheon.

Mr. Jackson: When I moved to L.A., we didn’t have a church that we went to at all. And my brother and I, Richard Lee Jackson—he’s an actor, and he’s in Continue reading “From General Hospital to the Hospital of Souls:  Interview with Jonathan Jackson, USA”

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Jozef Van den Berg, actor, the Netherlands: From atheism to Orthodoxy (+Video)

http://orthodox-heart-sites.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART SITES

joseph

Jozef Van den Berg, actor, the Netherlands:

From atheism to Orthodoxy

Jozef Van den Berg (Beers, 22 August 1949) is a Dutch puppeteer, playwright and actor, who nowadays lives as a hermit.

http://vimeo.com/39403424

http://vimeo.com/9668812

Biography of Joseph Van den Berg

Youth

From the age of seven, he lived most of his youth at Cuijk, where his father bought an old rectory and tended an accountancy bureau. His father was a primary school teacher, first at Beers and then Rijkevoort, and a member of the resistance during the War. The family he belonged to consisted of eleven children. On January 30th, 1962, at the age of twelve, his father died and afterwards also his best friend Fritz. Already as a child, Van den Berg wanted to become a priest. For Christmas his mother gave him a set to play a little priest. At the age of 10, he played his first theater role as a Pharisee in a Passion Play of the Welpen at the patronage building at Cuijk. At the age of 13 he got a girlfriend, because of which the priesthood disappeared into the background. During his secondary school at the Internaat Bisschoppelijk College [Boarding School Diocesan College] in Roermond he was very active in school theater. For example, he played Sisyphus in the play Sisyphus And Death, and later on, inspired by Henk van Ulsen, with a lot of success Diary Of A Madman by Gogol.

Puppetry

At the end of the 60’s, after obtaining his high school degree, he passed his entrance examination and started at the theater school in Arnhem, which he quit after the second year. He went to live with Ruth in Arnhem and later on moved to Groningen. He applied for social assistance and started playing puppet shows. He borrowed a horse and cart and wandered around puppetering. In this period he became member of the Gurdjieff movement. After a show in Groningen he got acquainted to his wife Hansje, whom he married on September 11th, 1973. They had four children: Lotte [nowadays a well-known playwriter, theater actor and director herself], Maartje, Jasmijn and Jesse Van den Berg. In Groningen he lived on a farm and rented a basement at Zwanestraat where on Wednesday afternoon he played for children, and on Friday evening for adults. He started his professional career as a puppeteer in a puppet show and there he brought numerous characters to life. Eventually he removed the curtain and by doing so became the man with the puppets, visible for the audience. His improvisations were replaced by a play with a title. With a fire department truck, he played with a wandering puppet theater. Living in a mobile home, he brought his plays to the people.

In 1980 he received the Hans Snoekprijs for Appeloog [Apple Eye], left Groningen and moved to Herwijnen in the Betuwe region. There he wrote Moeke en de Dwaas [(little) Mother and the Fool] for the Holland Festival. In Continue reading “Jozef Van den Berg, actor, the Netherlands: From atheism to Orthodoxy (+Video)”